Resurrecting the blog

As you can see I’ve decided to resurrect the blog and was going to follow the same installation procedure as before, but it didn’t work out for me. I’m rather pleased as this forced me down a different (and more secure) path, including HTTPS. Google have been making noises for some time relating to favouring websites that are adopting HTTPS and with this now being such a simple and free process, there really is no excuse. I took all my guidance for this entire process from DigitalOcean which is ironic as I spin up my virtual servers with BHost – Read More

RUAG Breach – A lesson in cyber espionage tradecraft tools & techniques

Following a successful data breach of Swiss defense contractor RUAG – specialising in aerospace technology – the Swiss Governmental Computer Emergency Response Team (GovCERT) took the unusual step of publishing a comprehensive data breach report. The reasons given for publishing the report: …to give organizations the chance to check their networks for similar infections, and to show the modus operandi of the attacker group. You can download the summary technical report here (PDF) – 2 pages And the full espionage report here (PDF) – 34 Pages If the full report is a little TL;DR for your time or taste – or even Read More

GDPR – The Right To Be Forgotten

In light of recent headlines purporting our ‘Right to be Forgotten’ is newly enshrined in the General Data Protection regulation (GDPR) I thought I’d take a closer look. The ‘right to be forgotten’ actually has its roots in the 1995 Data Protection Directive: Article 12 Right of access Member States shall guarantee every data subject the right to obtain from the controller: (b) as appropriate the rectification, erasure or blocking of data the processing of which does not comply with the provisions of this Directive, in particular because of the incomplete or inaccurate nature of the data; This Article (among others) was Read More

GDPR – Profiling – A Quick Overview

Although the 1995 Data Protection Directive included the right for people not to be subject to decisions based solely on automatic processing of data, the term “Profiling” was not legally defined. “Profiling” makes an appearance twenty three times in the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and its importance is no doubt a response to the advances in Big Data Predictive Analysis. Article 4 defines “profiling” thusly: (4) ‘profiling’ means any form of automated processing of personal data consisting of the use of personal data to evaluate certain personal aspects relating to a natural person, in particular to analyse or predict Read More

UK Cyber Security Breaches Survey 2016 – Some Quick Stats

The UK government has just published the Cyber Security Breaches Survey 2016 (PDF here). Commissioned by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, as part of the National Cyber Security Programme. It was carried out by Ipsos MORI, in partnership with the Institute for Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Portsmouth, and comprised: ▪ a representative telephone survey of 1,008 UK businesses from 30 November 2015 to 5 February 2016 ▪ a total of 30 in-depth interviews undertaken in January and February 2016 to follow up businesses that Here’s some pertinent stats lifted from the report: (69%) say cyber security is either Read More

#GDPR – You have two years to comply

After four years of discussions – and no doubt many head-desk moments – the Official Journal of the European Union has published the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This replaces the 1995 Data Protection Directive. The distinction between “Regulation” and “Directive” is an important one. The previous directive was just that – a document to direct EU member states in the formation of national legislation pertaining to data protection. The regulation differs in that it is directly applicable to all member states without the need for legislation on a national level. Although there remains a small degree of latitude on certain matters for individual states, Read More

The normalisation of biometric authentication

The ‘problem with passwords’ is well documented and grows more acute as traditional network boundaries are blurred with the adoption of mobile devices. As a result, the imperative to counter user impersonation and prove authentication on endpoint devices has never been so critical. Traditionally, biometric solutions have not been widely adopted because of complexity, interoperability, credential storage, spoofing, false failures, flawed technology and perceived intrusiveness. Compounding this, high-profile biometric breaches such as the one that hit the OPM have naturally led the public to ask again “Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?”, and no less because if their card is compromised, they can Read More

Information Security Basics ARE Sexy

It all begins with a headline such as: “Hackers hack [insert new thing hacked]” Obviously, you change “insert new thing hacked” with whatever has just been demonstrated at the latest hacking convention, be that an ATM, fridge, sniper rifle, car, baby monitor, etc. Following this news, two camps will emerge. The first is the FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt) group characterised by doomsaying. The second is the junk-hacking group, which is characterised by being unimpressed with what they call ‘junk hacking’ (junk I found around my house and scared you by hacking it). Both groups probably have their merits. One thing Read More

Insider threat PSYOPs – know thy employees

Following on from a previous post, in which I noted that a recent security survey revealed that 31% of all information security incidents were employee-related, I wanted to spend a little time on the insider threat. In as many different ways as the inside threat can manifest – from sabotage to theft – there are as many reasons and personality types engaging in such activity. Thus, this is not an examination of insider-threat criminology, but given we expend so much of our time keeping the bad actor out of our networks, this is an exploration of what might be done to prevent the potential bad actor Read More

GCHQ – Moving Out From the Shadows

Noun: Smart Home Definition: Mini data center minus admin and security staff. This is of course tongue-in-cheek, although some will recognise truth in this. As consumers we are reliant on manufacturers of our “smart appliances” being cognisant of security and engineering safeguards. But can we trust them? Yesterday we learned that despite £11bn being spent on new smart energy meters due to be installed in every UK home, GCHQ had to intervene as every meter had the same encryption key. We saw a similar problem in Spain in 2014 with poorly protected credentials. Aside from miscreants leveraging these weaknesses to lower their own energy bills, there Read More